Maple Butterscotch Cookies

Over the years, I’ve probably had all the cookie fails that could be had.  Most of them occurred before the internet (when dinosaurs roamed the Earth) and I had to figure things out on my own.  An early lesson was the curse of the overspread cookie.  You know, that thing when you place balls of cookie dough on a pan to bake and when you open the oven it looks like you’ve made one giant cookie?  That led to me almost always scooping my cookie dough into balls first, placing them closely together on a cookie sheet and refrigerating them.  I see a lot of recipes that call for chilling the dough, but I find scooping first is a lot easier than trying to do it later with super cold dough.  My hands get crampy.  Anyway, that led to a new discovery on this particular recipe. At the time of this writing, I am now 6 weeks out from a major hip replacement and I get tired and sore if I do too much. Anyway, I made this dough and was too tired to finish with the baking, so I snuck a taste and then left it in the refrigerator until the next day.  Then I snuck another taste off the edge of a dough ball and I’ll be darned if the flavors of the spices and the maple weren’t deeper and richer and just more! I did some research and found a school of thought that says that, like yeast risen doughs, cookie dough flavors can enrich over time.

In conclusion, these delicious cookies are made even more delicious if you follow your lazier instincts and bake them tomorrow.  You’re welcome. 

(p.s. my daughters would like me to say I wasn’t being lazy, I was listening to my body and being practical.  You can be lazy or practical. It’s all delicious.)

This recipe makes 36 cookies.

 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
 1 tsp baking soda
 1 tsp fine grain salt
 1 tsp ground ginger
 ½ tsp nutmeg (i only use freshly ground nutmeg, which is about 8 scritches on a fine zester)
 ½ cup room temperature butter (1 stick)
 ¼ cup granulated sugar
 ¾ cup packed brown sugar (light or dark, whatever you have or prefer)
 1 large room temperature egg
 ¼ cup pure maple syrup (Aunt Jemima need not apply)
 1 tsp maple extract (found in the baking aisle next to the vanilla extract)
 1 pkg (11 oz) Nestlé Butterscotch Baking Chips
Maple Drizzle
 2 tbsp milk (either whole or 2% is fine)
 2 tbsp melted unsalted butter
 1 1/2 tbs pure maple syrup
 ¼ tsp maple extract
 1 1/2 - 2 cups powdered sugar

1

Whisk the flour, baking soda, salt, ginger, and nutmeg in a medium bowl and set aside.

2

Using a stand mixer or a hand mixer, cream the butter and the sugars together until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the egg and mix until fully incorporated. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl with a spatula. Add the maple syrup and the extracts and beat in until everything is fully mixed.

3

Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients a little at a time to avoid a flour storm. Only mix until just combined (a few flour streaks are even preferred) so as to not over mix the dough and develop all those strong 💪 glutens. We want those in bread, not cookies!

Add in the butterscotch chips and just mix for a few seconds with the mixer or, preferably, fold them in by hand so the chips don’t break and you don’t over mix the dough.

4

Place parchment paper on a large sheet pan and, using a small cookie scoop (2 tbs is my preferred size) place scoops of cookie dough right next to each other. I got exactly 36 dough balls. Place the sheet tray in the refrigerator at least two hours and up to overnight. (At this point you could even freeze the dough for a later date, but I’ve rarely managed to do that!)

5

Preheat oven to 350° and line 2-3 large sheet pans with parchment paper. (Don’t have 2-3 large sheet pans? Just let the pans cool between batches and keep the dough balls refrigerated)

Place dough balls on cookie sheet at least 2 inches apart. I usually fit 8 cookies per sheet tray so they don’t bump each other during the bake. Bake for 12-14 minutes, or until the edges look nicely browned. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the pan for 5 minutes, then remove to a cooling rack.

6

Let’s make the maple drizzle! Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a small pan and allow to cool slightly. Add 2 tablespoons of milk, 1 1/2 tablespoons of maple syrup and the maple extract and mix well. Add 1 1/2 cups of powdered sugar and whisk to combine. it should have a nice drizzly consistency. If it is too thin add a little more powdered sugar. If it is too thick, add a scoosh more milk.

Place cooled cookies on a wire rack over a sheet tray (to catch excess drizzle). Using the tines of a fork or a small spoon wiggle waggle the drizzle back and forth over the cookies. You know what I mean. If you don’t look, just at the pictures. All wiggle waggled and delicious. The icing dries fairly firmly after about an hour, so you can stack them for sharing. If you share. Be you.

Ingredients

 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
 1 tsp baking soda
 1 tsp fine grain salt
 1 tsp ground ginger
 ½ tsp nutmeg (i only use freshly ground nutmeg, which is about 8 scritches on a fine zester)
 ½ cup room temperature butter (1 stick)
 ¼ cup granulated sugar
 ¾ cup packed brown sugar (light or dark, whatever you have or prefer)
 1 large room temperature egg
 ¼ cup pure maple syrup (Aunt Jemima need not apply)
 1 tsp maple extract (found in the baking aisle next to the vanilla extract)
 1 pkg (11 oz) Nestlé Butterscotch Baking Chips
Maple Drizzle
 2 tbsp milk (either whole or 2% is fine)
 2 tbsp melted unsalted butter
 1 1/2 tbs pure maple syrup
 ¼ tsp maple extract
 1 1/2 - 2 cups powdered sugar

Directions

1

Whisk the flour, baking soda, salt, ginger, and nutmeg in a medium bowl and set aside.

2

Using a stand mixer or a hand mixer, cream the butter and the sugars together until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the egg and mix until fully incorporated. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl with a spatula. Add the maple syrup and the extracts and beat in until everything is fully mixed.

3

Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients a little at a time to avoid a flour storm. Only mix until just combined (a few flour streaks are even preferred) so as to not over mix the dough and develop all those strong 💪 glutens. We want those in bread, not cookies!

Add in the butterscotch chips and just mix for a few seconds with the mixer or, preferably, fold them in by hand so the chips don’t break and you don’t over mix the dough.

4

Place parchment paper on a large sheet pan and, using a small cookie scoop (2 tbs is my preferred size) place scoops of cookie dough right next to each other. I got exactly 36 dough balls. Place the sheet tray in the refrigerator at least two hours and up to overnight. (At this point you could even freeze the dough for a later date, but I’ve rarely managed to do that!)

5

Preheat oven to 350° and line 2-3 large sheet pans with parchment paper. (Don’t have 2-3 large sheet pans? Just let the pans cool between batches and keep the dough balls refrigerated)

Place dough balls on cookie sheet at least 2 inches apart. I usually fit 8 cookies per sheet tray so they don’t bump each other during the bake. Bake for 12-14 minutes, or until the edges look nicely browned. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the pan for 5 minutes, then remove to a cooling rack.

6

Let’s make the maple drizzle! Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a small pan and allow to cool slightly. Add 2 tablespoons of milk, 1 1/2 tablespoons of maple syrup and the maple extract and mix well. Add 1 1/2 cups of powdered sugar and whisk to combine. it should have a nice drizzly consistency. If it is too thin add a little more powdered sugar. If it is too thick, add a scoosh more milk.

Place cooled cookies on a wire rack over a sheet tray (to catch excess drizzle). Using the tines of a fork or a small spoon wiggle waggle the drizzle back and forth over the cookies. You know what I mean. If you don’t look, just at the pictures. All wiggle waggled and delicious. The icing dries fairly firmly after about an hour, so you can stack them for sharing. If you share. Be you.

Maple Butterscotch Cookies

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